Welcome to the ReTested Media Room

Thanks for visiting the media room. I take your time very seriously, and I don't believe in wasting one second. 

If you're interested in scheduling an interview please complete this form. If you're on deadline, include your phone number, too, and I will call you back quickly.

Below you'll find an outline of what the media room offers. It's been designed for easy navigation, so you can get what you need quickly. I look forward to connecting.

In Christ,

P.S. Get a sample of ReTested.

Contents of the Media Room

Description of ReTested

ReTested & ABORTION

  • Trailer 
  • Sample Interview Questions
  • Abortion Statistics in the American Church

ReTested & WORSHIP AND WORSHIP-BASED PRAYER

  • Sample Interview Questionswith no mention of abortion
  • Worship-Focused Prayer Resources Mentioned in ReTested
  • Worship Music Mentioned in ReTested

ReTested, MENTAL ILLNESS, & HOMELESSNESS

  • Sample Interview Questions
  • Mental Illness & Homelessness Statistics

BIO: Cheryl Krichbaum

Inspiration & Back Story for the Faces of Abortion Series

Description of ReTested

You can read the back of the book on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or another bookseller's website. What I've written below, I've never written before. It's a perspective written just for you.

The pro-choice movement has moved past the "is it a baby?" debate. Today, it doesn't matter. Even after the baby is born, politicians are advocating for abortion after-the-fact, or infanticide.

Trying to explain that the pre-born are babies no longer matters. So now what do pro-lifers say?

We say that abortion is bad for women. I knowbecause I had an abortion.

The pro-choice movement has long been arguing for women while the pro-life movement argues for babies. Let's do what we should have been doing all along: Let's talk about how abortion is bad for women.

The Faces of Abortion Series aims to equip the pro-life movement to speak about what abortion does to women. In future books, you hear abortion stories for many women who are now regretful, post-abortive Christians. You'll hear from them directly about why they "chose" abortion and the devastating effects on their lives.

I knew the Lord wanted me to write book two before I knew about book one, ReTested. I had already begun talking to other women about writing their stories when the Lord impressed on me that I had to write my own first.

I wrote the book in about a month, thinking that it was done. Then God showed me that my story was not complete. He allowed the circumstances that resulted in the last three chapters. And that's when I understood that my story was about more than abortion

ReTested is about learning how to respond to difficult situations. If we can learn to respond well to life's tests, we won't be so quick to "fix" situations ourselves.

Whether you're personally affected by abortion or not, read this book to learn how to respond to life's tests. Read this book to be reminded that Christ came to set us free. 

Read this book to learn how the abortion-minded think. Read this book to see abortion from a different perspective--not to convert you to pro-choice. MAY IT NEVER BE! But to equip you for those coffee-shop or social-media conversations about this very controversial topic.

ReTested & Abortion

Trailer Regarding Abortion

Sample Interview Questions

1. In 60 seconds, what is ReTested about?

ReTested is my story from about ages 15 to 48 in which I was tested by my siblings' mental illnesses—tests that I keep retaking. 

With each test, I responded in progressively better ways. The story starts in high school when I felt like I had no control. I survived but made life-altering "choices," including abortion.

After choosing Christ, I educated myself about mental illnesses but then strived to fix everything.

More recently I was tested by mental illness again. This time I learned to respond in a thriving way despite the difficult circumstances.

With each test of family mental illness came a test on abortion. The result is that the Lord has called me to speak boldly and not hold back (Isaiah 58:1), to shed light on what abortion does to women, and to show The Church how to love them over the life line.

2. ReTested is the first book in the Faces of Abortion Series. Tell me about the series.

The Faces of Abortion Series will have many Christian women's stories as well as research on the psychological effects of abortion.

We tell our stories not to justify what we've done but to explain how our thinking led us to abort our precious babies. We want you to better understand how abortion-minded women think, who and what influences our decisions, and why we now think that being pro-life is pro-woman.

3. Tell me about your background. What was your family like when you were in high school? How old were you when you had the abortion?

I was 17 when I aborted my baby. She would be 31 years old today.

I grew up in a lower-middle class family. Both of my parents worked. In addition, my dad was and still is the choir director at church. My mom, herself a preacher's kid, had been a church organist and was always involved with ministry in one way or another.

I am the youngest of three. When I was in high school, my sister and brother had long since graduated from high school and moved out of the house, so I started as the spoiled youngest and then it was like I was an only child.

...until my sister and her baby moved in. Then I was the neglected middle child.

My sister became a single mom because her husband left her. Her husband left her because of her mental illness, which we found out many years later was schizophrenia.

4. Why did you choose abortion?

Well, first I knew that I would not raise the baby myself because I was already stressed out by having my nephew around, who was 2 at the time. I knew my boyfriend wouldn't marry me, and he didn't want to raise a child.

Between abortion and adoption, abortion was the easier choice because I could hide the shame of pregnancy out of wedlock and still finish high school at the top of my class.

Besides, my parents were already stressed by my sister's mental illness and caring for her and her son. I didn't think any of us could handle anything more.

These are all lies of the Enemy, of course, because we worship a great God who empowers us to love greatly and do all things through Him.

5. Before the #ShoutYourAbortion hashtag, women did not usually tell people they had abortions. Why do you think that has changed? Why do you share about your abortion?

The shout-your-abortion hashtag started in 2015, but it got a rebirth last June when the person who first shouted her abortion wrote an article in O magazine. The intent is for women to share their abortion stories without “sadness, shame, or regret.”

People are revealing their hearts. They want to justify what they did. I can understand that because I once felt justified in having an abortion.

But I wonder how many women have shouted their abortion but still feel sadness, shame, and regret. Or, worse yet, are still numb and not living their own lives to the fullest because they feed dead inside, as I did.

I share my story with sadness, shame, and regret. I am not trying to justify what I did. I murdered my daughter. There's no justification for shedding innocent blood.

But if we're going to love women over the life line, then we need people like me explaining what abortion does to women, how it drains our vitality and how we need healing through the forgiveness of Jesus Christ to be completely restored and living life abundantly.

So I share my story to inform pro-life Christians, to encourage them to love women over the life line, and to help other post-abortive women find healing through Christ.

6. You shared your abortion testimony several times when you were a new Christian, but then you went quiet for many years. Why is that?

After choosing Christ, I shared my story twice each time to about 200 people. The first time, I was embraced by exactly one person, one of half-a-dozen pastors among 200 people. The second time 200 women walked right past me.

I call it the "Christian cold shoulder." But I think they just didn't know what to say to me.

The next time I shared my story, I didn't want to and really only agreed because I was moving out of state shortly afterwards.

It took me a long time to get over how Christians reacted to me. Now I share my story no matter how people react because they need to hear the truth of what abortion does to women.

7. You talk about healing from your abortion. How does one heal from abortion?

Confession and forgiveness

8. From a spiritual perspective, what happens to women who abort?

9. What recommendations do you have for talking to the pro-choice or the abortion-minded?

10. Where do you see this book going? (speaking, bible study)

With Abby's Johnson's recent movie about her own conversion from pro-choice to pro-life, my son is asking if I'd make my book into a movie. Do I want to do that right now? I don't think I'm ready. First, I need to get used to everyone knowing my sins through this book. Abby Johnson is a courageous woman. Maybe I'll be that courageous some day, too. But I'll only agree to making it a movie if it's done well and with the okay of my family.

Today, I want to spread the word about how to talk to the abortion-minded by speaking to Christian groups and by leading others through Bible study that includes practical tools and real-life statistics so that Christians are not just equipped for their pro-life conversations but are moved to become closer to Christ--because there's no better place to be. You can find the bible studies online at MybodyMyworship.org.

AND, in a year, I hope to hold a conference title MybodyMyworship for mothers and daughters.

2002 adult baptism

2004 Christmas Tea

2009 City Church

2016 John disappears

2016-17 First Uganda trip

2017-18 Third Uganda trip

2018 John reappears

Abortion in the American Church

The following statistics are from Care Net’s 2016 research, “Study of Women Who Have Had an Abortion & Their Views on Church.” 

  • 36% of post-abortive women were attending church once a month or more at the time of their first abortion. That's over 800,000 church-going women in the USA. (I had just quit going to church at the time of my abortion.)
  • 59% of post-abortive women expected to be judged or condemned by their church (as did I).
  • 61% of post-abortive women who attended church once a month or more did experience judgment or condemnation by their church. (I describe my experience as "the Christian cold shoulder," but I think that my church just didn't know how to respond.)
  • Women are most likely to discuss their "choice" with the father of the baby, then a medical professional, then their own mother, and then their friend(s). Church and pregnancy centers tied for 10th place. (I discussed it with the father of my baby and informed my parents and his parents of my decision.)
  • Only 19% of post-abortive women who attend church at least once per month said their church provided information on alternatives to abortion.
  • 30% of post-abortive women have had more than one abortion, according to Care-Net's statistics, but the Guttmacher Institute reports 45%. (It's my opinion that once you've had an abortion, it's easier to abort again because your soul is already dead. If I hadn't been healed by Christ, I would've had another abortion.)
  • 49% of post-abortive women agree that pastors' teachings on forgiveness don't seem to apply to abortion. That means that over 400,000 church-going women in the USA do not believe God will forgive them.
  • Only 43% of post-abortive women agree that it is safe to talk with their pastor. 
  • Only 39% of post-abortive women agree that pastors are sensitive to the pressures of unplanned pregnancy.
  • Only 38% of post-abortive women agree that churches are a safe place to discuss pregnancy options.
  • 54% of post-abortive women agree that churches over-simplify pregnancy options.

ReTested thru the LENS of JOB:
Worship Music & Worship-Based Prayer

Sample Interview Questions

1. In 60 seconds, what is ReTested about?

ReTested is my story from about ages 15 to 48 in which I was tested and retested by my siblings' mental illnesses—both of my siblings—tests that I keep retaking. 

With each test, I responded in progressively better ways. The story starts in high school when I felt like I had no control. I survived but made life-altering "choices," including abortion.

After finding Christ and some of the healing He offers, I educated myself about mental illnesses but then strived to fix everything.

More recently I was completely healed from my abortion and then tested by mental illness again. This time I learned to respond to my siblings' illnesses in a thriving way without stressing out or neglecting my needs or the needs of my family.

2. At the end of your book, you talk about the book of Job and how he was tested and retested. How are  your responses like Job's responses?

3. How did you learn to worship God through prayer?

4. What books do you recommend for learning how to worship God through prayer?

5. What inspired you to worship God in song?

6. How do your feelings change when you worship God by singing?

7. What are your favorite worship songs?

8. What are your favorite hymns?

9.

10. Where do you see this book going? (speaking, bible studies, movie)

ReTested, Mental Illness, & Homelessness

Sample Interview Questions

1. In 60 seconds, what is ReTested about?

ReTested is my story from about ages 15 to 48 in which I was tested and retested by my siblings' mental illnesses—both of my siblings—tests that I keep retaking. 

With each test, I responded in progressively better ways. The story starts in high school when I felt like I had no control. I survived but made life-altering "choices," including abortion.

After finding Christ and some of the healing He offers, I educated myself about mental illnesses but then strived to fix everything.

More recently I was completely healed from my abortion and then tested by mental illness again. This time I learned to respond to my siblings' illnesses in a thriving way without stressing out or neglecting my needs or the needs of my family.

2. How many siblings do you have? What are their mental illnesses?

I have one sister and one brother; they are both older than me. They both have schizophrenia.

3. What is schizophrenia?

4. How did their mental illness affect you? (different answers for sister than for brother)

When my sister became mentally ill, I became the ignored child after being the center of attention. The result was feeling unloved even though I know that my parents have always loved me. They did the best that they knew how without even realizing how negatively I was affected by what was going on in our house.

When my brother became mentally ill, I was a 30-something adult but a baby Christian. I left the church when my sister became mentally ill because church wasn't helping. When my brother became mentally ill, I was determined to get help from my church. I sought out practical help and helpful Bible verses. 

When my sister was first sick, we didn't know what we didn't know. When my brother was first sick, I was determined to learn everything I needed to know. But then I was stressed out trying to fix everything.

More recently, I was confronted with my brother's mental illness again. This time, I was a much more mature Christian. I was again unwilling to repeat mistakes from previous encounters with mental illness. This time, I found solice in worship music. While singing to the Lord while crying—literally—I learned that I could hear God much more clearly. As a result, I did things and didn't do things, said things and didn't say things. God was leading me the whole way through the situation. My siblings still have schizophrenia, but now I respond with peace that surpasses understanding because I'm following Christ rather than striving to fix everything.

5. Are your siblings still mentally ill? Do you expect them to be healed?

Both of my siblings still have schizophrenia. Because I have faith in Christ, I believe they will be healed some day. And what a story they will have to tell!

6. What advice do you have for families who have mentally ill family members?

First, get serious about worshiping God through prayer and song and get serious about your Bible study. You are going to need God like never before. You can get the fruit of the Spirit from worship-based prayer, singing praises through all circumstances, and Bible study.

Second, get educated. Contact the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. Take their classes. Learn everything you can about the different diagnoses and about your rights in light of 

7. How can the local church help families who struggle with mentally illness?


BIO: Cheryl Krichbaum

PRONUNCIATION: Share-ell (not Shirley) K-rich-bomb (not Kirch-bomb)—although it's a German last name, we pronounce it American-style: just like it is spelled. KR-itch-bomb.

AGE: I turn 50 later this year! (and not ashamed to tell anyone)

LIVES: In northern Virginia near Washington, DC; originally from Minnesota; lived south of Atlanta for a few years (I talk about all three in the book)

MARRIED with CHILDREN: to Russ with two boys, who are teen/tween

PROFESSION: scientific and technical writer, instructional design, project management, writing teacher

Cheryl Krichbaum is a speaker, writer, and creator of online Bible studies. She is passionate about speaking directly to the concerns of abortion-minded women, an audience she knows well because she used to be one of them. Cheryl had an abortion when she was 17. Today, her daughter would be 31 years old. She honors her daughter by helping the pro-life speak directly to pro-choice concerns so that abortion in The Church is reduced from 40% to ZERO.

How can we expect God to move on the politics of abortion when The Church is littered with abortion and extra-marital sex?

Inspiration & Background for the Faces of Abortion Series

As Cheryl describes in ReTested, she didn't want to be in the abortion conversation. She had shared her Christian testimony more than once and didn't feel well-received.

But when God made it clear that He wanted Cheryl to share her story and teach others why abortion is bad for women, she got the God-inspired idea to tell the stories of many post-abortive women. "Women need to hear from women."

Because she was avoiding the abortion conversation, Cheryldidn't even know there was a #shoutyourabortion hashtag. After naming the book series Faces of Abortion, Cheryl learned that #shoutyourabortion was a thing and became even more determined to #shoutyourabortionregret.

The Faces of Abortion Series will tell many stories of post-abortive, repentant Christian women (and men) who can help us understand what led them to abort, who or what influenced their "choice," and how God has reconciled with them. The series will also include the results of studies that show the psychological effects of abortion. The goal is to equip pro-life Christians so that they know what to say in their water-cooler and social-media conversations.

Even though Cheryl had begun asking women to share their stories for the book series, the Lord impressed on her that she needed to tell her own story first. Perhaps the world needs to understand why this topic is so close to her heart. Perhaps The Church needs to understand why women have closed their ears to what Christians have to say about abortion. Perhaps ReTested is about more than abortion.

In ReTested, readers will learn that every life test is an opportunity to choose Christ and follow Him—truly follow Him, not strive to get ahead of Him. Through worship-based prayer and worship music, Cheryl learned to thrive despite life's tests. Tests that may or may not have to do with abortion. 

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